Interview - Cody Harris

When did you become a photographer?


Cody: Around October 2014, I bought my first DSLR!


What inspires you to create?

I love the idea of creating photos that truly take the viewer out of the real world. I love how surreal photography can be.

What’s in your gear bag?

I am a gear hoarder... It's bad. But my main get up is two Canon 5DIIIs, the 35Lii, 50L, 85Lii, and the 135L and of course, the hold fast moneymaker- amiright?

Do you have a favorite lens/camera?

Absolutely! The 5Diii and 35Lii. MMM.

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What’s your favorite type of food?

Pizza and Tacos

Do you have any other hobbies?

Yes! I love playing music. Guitar, piano, drums and percussion- it's my getaway from photography and helps me refresh.

How do you like your coffee?

Cold brew all day!
What’s your favorite movie?

The entire Harry Potter series.

Where are you from?

Hot Springs, AR. But currently reside in Nashville


Do you have a defining moment in your career?

I actually did! I really started investing in the education side of photography and making myself learn and challenging myself. That's when things really started to make sense to me.

Tell us about your vision, what’s your style of photography? 

I love photos that encompass every part of love. The happy, the sad, the calm and the adventurous moments. I'd define my style as intimate, moody, and adventurous.

When you’re in a creative rut, how do you get unstuck?

Lots of things actually! Creative shoots, couple shoots with a completely different type of location or setting etc. Traveling and music are also two thigns that really help!

How much of a photograph do you pre-plan and how much editing do you do after?

I am a huge planner. I google map every location up and down, google sessions from the area to see how and where the light falls and research the hike times for more remote locations. My editing process looks fairly different than my original raw photo but I aim to love my photos in camera as well before moving on.

Balance is important, how do you balance photography and your personal life?

Just learning to say no sometimes has helped a ton. Using the "I'm not at my desk" as a means of communicating that I am not available so I can be present in my personal life.

What’s your best piece of advice for another photographer?

Invest in yourself. Every. Single. Day. Learn, set up shoots, attend workshops, keep decent gear maintained, edit older photos over and over etc. Just work your ass off. Be willing to spend more time than you are paid for so you can relax later down the road. Hustle.

Do you have any great stories during one of your shoots?

Absolutely! I had a couple on top of a mountain as a storm rolled in and not only were they some of my favorite photos, the couple said it was one of the best experiences they've ever had together.

Who influences you?

My fiancé, Allison is a huge influence in my life. That sort of goes without saying. But it's so true. She backs me in everything I pursue and has never let me go without any oppurtunity. She's also played a huge part in making our business and workflow wonderful.

As far as another artist and photographer goes, I greatly admire Jordan Voth. He's a prime example of someone who's put in the work to build a wonderful brand and name for himself. He's also extremely humble and kind and someone I am glad I connected with and learned from.

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What would you tell someone who’s wondering if they should come to Over Yonder?

Do it! I say that because I know the work we have put in and how we plan to really invest in our attendees. This isn't a "look at what I can do- maybe you can too" workshop. This is focused on how we can help you and push you. We are going to raise questions that people are too scared to raise. We are going to share some bold statements and opinions on how to run your business in this industry and community. 

Interview - Twyla Jones

When did you become a photographer? 

Twyla: I purchased my first dslr 2 1/2 years ago but I had been taking really terrible out of focus photos for a while before that.

What inspires you to create?

Making connections with people. I become pretty invested in people’s stories and interactions as I’m getting to know them and as I watch them throughout the shoot. I love surprising them with stories they never realized were being told during our time together. I can’t tell you how many times someone has left a shoot fearing we didn’t capture anything. I just smile.

What’s in your gear bag? 

Nikon d750 and a Sigma Art 35.  Some gum, usually a toy car or dino my kids left for me.

Do you have a favorite lens/camera?

See above.  I don’t shoot with anything else, but I would really love to get my hands on a tilt shift.

What’s your favorite type of food? 

Sushi and Tacos. Food folded up in other food.

Do you have any other hobbies? 

Sometimes I try to get really good at swimming and running.

How do you like your coffee? 

In my mouth.

What’s your favorite movie?

The Silence of Sleep.

Where are you from? 

Kansas.

Do you have a defining moment in your career? 

Probably the moment I realized I was out doing exactly what I loved and I was the only one who could decide what I thought was beautiful and powerful.  I used to get pretty nervous before shoots and then it suddenly occurred to me that I was the expert at what I liked.  It’s important to shoot a lot so you can trust yourself to find beauty anywhere with anyone.

Tell us about your vision, what’s your style of photography? 

I like to think about my shoots as people enjoying their last day on earth together.  Where would you go? How would you express your love to those closest to you? What wild things would you want to do and who would you share them with?

When you’re in a creative rut, how do you get unstuck? 

Take more photos!  Shoot at a totally different time of day in a completely different type of location than I’m used to.

How much of a photograph do you pre-plan and how much editing do you do after? 

I usually have some sort of vision inspired by my subjects and locations, but it’s more of a feeling than an actual image. I try to infuse the session with this feeling letting my subjects and the beauty of the world around us continue to inspire me as we shoot!

Balance is important, how do you balance photography and your personal life? 

I don’t really.  I just accept that some days I will be intensely focused on a project and then I will have days that I don’t look at work at all and just enjoy my family. Inspiration and focus for work come in spurts for me and I find I work best when I don’t force myself to do anything I’m not feeling.

What’s your best piece of advice for another photographer?

Shoot what you feel.  You don’t need to look all around you for inspiration, look within and connect with who you really are. Translate the emotions you’re trying to evoke into actions for your subjects.

Who influences you?

Love for my fiance, children, family and friends.

What would you tell someone who’s wondering if they should come to Over Yonder? 

Come hang out with me!  I have so much to share with you and I can’t think of a better place than a cozy cottage in the mountains!  I’ll bring the whiskey.

Interview - Kyle Wilson

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When did you become a photographer? 

Kyle: I started shooting with my Dad during weddings when I was 14. After some years in between, I picked it up again and have been full time since 2011. 

What inspires you to create? 

Music and moments. The climax of a song, the big moment of calm just before the hero of a story gets to make their move or mark. These moments where the air is sucked inward just before everything happens.

What’s in your gear bag? 

2 Nikon D750’s
Nikon 24mm 1.4
Nikon 35mm 1.4
Sigma Art 35mm 1.4
Nikon 45TS 2.8
Nikon 58mm 1.4

Leica M240
Leica Summicron 50mm
Voigtlander 35mm 1.2

Do you have a favorite lens/camera?

I just recently jumped into the Leica rangefinder system this year and it practically never leaves my side.

What’s your favorite type of food?

Pizza. No doubt about it. You can pretty much win me over for anything with some za.

Do you have any other hobbies? 

Need some of those. Trying to pick up reading more.

How do you like your coffee? 

I love a good cortado.

What’s your favorite movie?

Back to the future for sure! Greatest time travel movie of all time.

Where are you from? 

Chicago, IL.

Do you have a defining moment in your career?

I think I always have these constant moving set of goals. Some of them are image based, financial or peer recognition. As of now it’s been getting more and more ecstatic clients and international bookings. 

Tell us about your vision, what’s your style of photography? 

I believe love is a spectrum. On one end is the happy rainbows and butterflies, and on the other is the more quiet heavy side of things. I tend to shoot more towards the ladder.

When you’re in a creative rut, how do you get unstuck?

Truth be told, I don’t have too much of a system for this. I relax some, watch some new movies or go record shopping and wait for it to hit me again.

How much of a photograph do you pre-plan and how much editing do you do after? 

I go into every shoot with a couple of photos I’d like to make in my head, and I use those as kind of stepping stones to the next organic progression. I do a pretty fair amount of editing after to get things in post to where they were in my head.

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Balance is important, how do you balance photography and your personal life?

I think this is probably one of the most import things. I have a really solid group of friends who I make sure I clock out and spend time with uninterrupted by work or emails. Creativity is like breathing, and if you’re constantly exhaling you’ll run out of things to make. You need to take time to inhale sometimes too.

What’s your best piece of advice for another photographer?

I think learning from and working with lots of different styles of photographers is an important aspect to learning the kind of work you want to produce and how you’d like to run your business.

Who influences you?

I try to keep this to a short list, but for a long time it’s been Sam Hurd, Sean Flanigan, Dylan Howell and Kristen Marie Parker. 

What would you tell someone who’s wondering if they should come to Over Yonder?

I can’t speak highly enough about my fellow speakers. Even I’m so excited to be hanging out with them! Over Yonder is going to be such a refreshing and casual way to get to spend time with some of the most impactful photographers I know. If you find yourself clinging to the darker side of things, this is the group for you.

Interview - Michael Cardwell

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When did you become a photographer?

Michael: I've been shooting since 2006 when I got my first Rebel XTi, but it wasn't until 2008 that I started taking it seriously and upgraded to a Canon 5D Mark 2, that was when I realized all of my additional income would go straight towards photography gear. 


What inspires you to create?

A little bit of everything. I love watching movies with great cinematography, they have such attention to every part of the frame, it's sometimes so subtle you don't even realize what all they're doing until you rewatch. I also love going on hikes and just getting unplugged for a while. I believe that Sunday's are for Exploring. Finally, I'd say I just have a deep desire to try and create something new and unique. I'd rather experiment than play it safe. 

 

What’s in your gear bag?

Canon 5D Mark IV and Sigma 35mm Art are my newest additions. I'm also one of those weird film shooters and two cameras I shoot a lot are my Contax 645 and my beloved Widelux F7. 

Do you have a favorite lens/camera?

Definitely the Widelux F7 currently, it shoots film panoramics with a rotating turret, there's only 3 shutter speeds and 5 apertures. There's no focus and if you hold it wrong you'll get your fingers in the frame. I absolutely love everything about this camera, it seems to capture everything and has this sense of authenticity about it. 

 
What’s your favorite type of food?

I love a good burger with an egg on it, but my absolute favorite food item is the Peanut Butter Pie at a local Memphis restaurant, Hog and Hominy. It's the one item I recommend to everyone, and so far, everyone's loved it just as much. 

Do you have any other hobbies? 

I like to hike on the weekends, since I have a full time office job at the moment. Also during the winters you'll find me at as many Memphis Grizzlies games as possible. 

 

How do you like your coffee?

I'm a relatively new coffee drinker, always been a fan of the smells whenever someone near me makes it. I like it best when it's in a good mug. If your mug game isn't strong, don't even bother. 


What’s your favorite movie?

Rocky is such a great series. It never fails to make you feel like you can accomplish anything and I'm excited to see where the franchise goes now with Creed, I thought it carried the torch perfectly and doesn't feel tacked on unnecessarily. Rocky IV may be the best simply since Rocky manages to end the Cold War by withstanding the onslaught of Ivan Drago. 

Where are you from? 

Memphis, TN born and raised. It's a city with a signature soul to it. I've been to bigger cities, I've been to better cities, but I'll never have another home like the 901. This place has a way of embedding itself into your DNA and really defines the artists that come from here. 

Do you have a defining moment in your career? 

Back in 2011, I was looking for work and sort of at a standstill with photography, I had an idea to take black and white portraits of interesting people from Memphis on a white seamless background. I managed to get a studio set up downtown in this great building, and the first week I managed to get 7 portraits taken over 4 days. But every person I shot that week sent me referrals and friends. I edited each photo session that night and had them posted on social media the following day. After 3 additional weeks I had shot almost 150 portraits of musicians, photographers, entrepreneurs and even the Mayor. My site I built to go alongside the project was being seen by everyone. I ended up getting a job doing Marketing for LensRentals.com a few months later because of it. 

Tell us about your vision, what’s your style of photography? 

My style would be raw and authentic. The goal of my photography is to capture a moment, something that makes you want to look at it twice. I want to evoke a reaction when you look at one of my photos. 

When you’re in a creative rut, how do you get unstuck? 

Keep shooting! Sometimes the best photos come from experimenting after your first, second, third, and fourth ideas all failed miserably. I managed to do a 365 project in 2014 that really pushed me to shoot consistently and to be able to create in whatever situation I was given. It takes a lot of pressure off of you, if you just accept that you have to take a photo in a situation, you just have to capture what you can. Sometimes it's absolutely unexpected what you'll end up with, sometimes you'll fail. But if you're going to fail, you might as well fail miserably! 

How much of a photograph do you pre-plan and how much editing do you do after? I'm not much of a pre-planner for most photographs, once I get to a location I try to look at it and whatever the most obvious shot is, I try to do something completely different. I do pre-plan roadtrips and scout potential locations as best as I can, and my editing is minimal. For the last 3 years I've shot about 95% film, and I love the aesthetic so I didn't want to mess with it much. I chose that medium because I loved the way it looked and the way it made me feel. 

Balance is important, how do you balance photography and your personal life?

Luckily I have an amazing girlfriend who's also a photographer, and most of my close friends are photographers as well. It's sort of an obsession that I have to surround myself with creatives. As much fun as I have being a photographer, it's always good to know when to leave the camera at home and just go enjoy yourself. 

What’s your best piece of advice for another photographer?

Don't be afraid to fail. Keep shooting and taking photos, the only way to get thru a creative rut is to just keeping working, and you'll shoot your way out of it before you know it. 

Who influences you?

Dan Winters is absolutely amazing and I love everything he does. Annie Liebowitz is fantastic, I love it when she shoots simply with one light and some film, I think that's my favorite work of hers. Helmut Newton was fantastic at pushing boundaries while still focusing on the art. 

What would you tell someone who’s wondering if they should come to Over Yonder? 

Over Yonder is an opportunity for you to grow as a photographer both creatively and professionally. I'm going to be speaking about building your brand because I think it's important. The other speakers are all AMAZING photographers and I'm so pysched to watch their process, see them shoot, watch them edit and just talk to them about their creative process. I know that by the end of the trip, I will be a better photographer, and so will everyone who attends.